Documentary Editing in the Age of Digital Humanities

Monday April 6, 2015

noon – 1:15pm

History Library (Sakamaki A201)

The field of Digital Humanities has transformed the way scholars of history and other humanities disciplines approach research of, access to, and manipulation of data. The use of technologies such as XML and the TEI have allowed for much more robust engagement with large sets of humanities driven data, and is continuing to shape the way we think about the intersection of humanities content and technology. By describing the ways the Office of the Historian at the U.S. Department of State has engaged with the DH field—including training with the Women Writers Project, the development of a CMS that allows for fully integrated content across our website, and the creation of a subject-specific taxonomy—this talk hopes to engender a lively discussion of the possibilities and challenges inherent in the ever-evolving field of Digital Humanities.


Erin Cozens earned her B.A. from Wellesley College and her M.A./M.S.L.I.S. from Simmons College before earning her doctorate in Pacific History from the University of Hawai‘i in 2011. Her dissertaCozenstion focused on gender and colonialism in nineteenth-century Aotearoa/New Zealand. After completing her degree, she took a position with the Office of the Historian at the U.S. Department of State, where she helps to compile, edit, and publish (both in print and digitally) the Foreign Relations of the United States series.  She has also continued her scholarly research, and has articles forthcoming in both The Journal of World History and The Journal of the History of Sexuality.